Donald Trump has been making headlines saying that, if elected, he wouldn’t just go after terrorists—he would kill their families.

And while the media has been shocked by this, why weren’t they outraged when President Barack Obama actually did?

This is a Reality Check you won’t see anywhere else.

Reality Check: Trump says he'd Kill Terrorists' Families, But …

Reality Check: Trump says he'd Kill Terrorists' Families, But Obama Already Has

Posted by Ben Swann on Tuesday, March 15, 2016

“I would be very, very firm with families, and that would make people think because they may not care about their lives, but they care—believe it or not—about their family’s lives.”

That was Trump insisting that he would be so tough on terror that, if elected, he would kill terrorists and he would target their families as well.

So while the media scrambles to demonize remarks about killing family members of terrorists, as they should, they seem to forget their collective silence when President Obama didn’t talk about doing that—he actually did it.

You probably don’t recognize this man, but his name was Anwar al-Awlaki, an American-born Muslim cleric who at one time was invited to the Pentagon after 9/11 to talk about the role of Muslims in America.

al-Awlaki became increasingly angry at the U.S. government’s spying on Muslims in mosques. He left the U.S. in 2004, traveled back to Yemen and became radicalized.

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The U.S. government called him an inspiration for the Fort Hood shooter, the failed underwear bomber, the failed Times Square bomber.

On September 30th, 2011, President Obama ordered a drone strike that killed al-Awlaki along with another U.S. citizen.

Plenty of you watching will say, so what? He was a terrorist. And you won’t be concerned about the fact that al-Awlaki was a U.S. citizen who got no due process.

But that is a discussion for another time, because the point I want to make today is not about al-Awlaki. It’s actually about what happened two weeks later.

Because two weeks after the killing of al-Awlaki, President Obama ordered a second drone strike, this one killed al-Awlaki’s 16-year-old son, Abdulrahman al-Awlaki.

Who was he? He too was a U.S. citizen. He was born in Denver, CO. He was not a member of al-Qaeda. He was not a militant.

He had not lived with his father for over two years because Anwar al-Awlaki had gone into hiding. Abdulrahman was not at a terror training camp when he was killed on September 4, 2013. He was at his second cousin’s home, a cousin he lived with while his father was in hiding.

He was the son of a man the U.S. government had decided was an enemy, and yet he himself was not even on the president’s kill list.

And what’s worse, after killing that 16 year old, the Obama Administration justified the killing by essentially saying that he should have had a better father.

We Are Change reporter Sierra Adamson: “…It’s an American citizen that is being targeted without due process, without trial. And, he’s underage. He’s a minor.”

Former White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs: “I would suggest that you should have a far more responsible father if they are truly concerned about the well being of their children. I don’t think becoming an al-Qaeda jihadist terrorist is the best way to go about doing your business.”

What you need to know is that when Trump says he would kill the families of terrorists, members of the media point to the Geneva Convention insisting that to kill terrorists’ families would be a war crime. They might be right.

So why have they been so quiet when this president has actually done it?

That’s Reality Check. Let’s talk about that on Twitter @BenSwann_

Watch Ben Swann’s full interview with President Obama, including questions about his kill list, courtesy of Fox 19, here:

Ben Swann grills President Obama over foreign policy

4 Years Ago Ben Swann gave President Obama the toughest interview of his Presidency. Swann questioned Obama on his kill list, supporting al Qaeda in Syria, indefinite detention of Americans and ending the war in Afghanistan. This interview was shot in 2012 and yet so many of the questions are very valid today. Learn more:

Posted by Ben Swann on Monday, January 4, 2016