American police ‘excessively militarized’ says new report

Must Read

U.S. Government Sues Snowden Over Memoir Release

The U.S. government took swift legal action against famed NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden after the release of his memoir, "Permanent Record." The government's complaint, filed September 17th, alleges that Snowden, a former CIA employee and former contractor for the NSA, violated non-disclosure agreements with the NSA and CIA by publishing this book without first submitting it for prepublication review "in violation of his express obligations under the agreements he signed."

Holland Center

Holland Center is a day treatment program and medical clinic for children with autism.

Reality Check: Proof WTC Building 7 Did Not Fall Down The Way Gov. Agency Claims?

What really happened to World Trade Center Building 7 on September 11th, the Franklin Square and Munson Fire District Commissioners’ historic resolution calling for a new investigation, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks' bombshell multi-year, $300K study of WTC 7 and how it collapsed.
Zach McAuliffe
Zach McAuliffe is a University of Dayton alumni with degrees in journalism and English. He wants to present people with all the facts they need to make informed decisions on the world around them. He also enjoys Shakespeare and long walks on the beach with his puppy Lily.

A new report from the ACLU states American police forces across the country have adopted tactics and weaponry commonly used by America’s military forces.

The report focuses on the use of SWAT teams and their subsequent expansion since their inception in the late 1960’s.

These “quasi-militaristic” units, the report says, were created to handle emergency situations such as hostage scenarios, active shooter incidents, and riots.  However, nearly 80% of all SWAT raids now focus on conducting search warrants for drug related offenses, while only 7% of SWAT operations were for dangerous situations.

- Newsletter -

The War on Drugs seems to be one of the major causes for the increase in militarization, claims the report, as police began stockpiling military-grade weapons to help combat drugs on the streets.

The Department of Defense Excessive Property Program has been the key component allowing police departments to obtain the military-grade weapons- most of which has been previously used in combat- for free.

Of the military-grade weaponry used by police across the nation, a New York Times report says about 500 planes, helicopters, and mine-resistant armored vehicles have been obtained, alongside 94,000 machine guns.

Kara Dansky, the ACLU Senior Counsel and author of the repoAmericrt, told Mashable in an interview, the increased militarization of the police in America might be “terrifying people, destroying communities and actually undermining public safety.”

Reckless and needless violence, as the report calls it, have also risen with the increase in firepower.

In 2011, Jose Guerena, a 26-year-old Marine who served in Iraq, was killed by a SWAT team in his home in Tucson, Arizona.

Guerena’s wife woke at night after hearing a noise and seeing a silhouette of a man outside their house.  Guerena grabbed his personal rifle from his closet to investigate the noise, telling his wife to stay put.

SWAT teams were carrying out raids in the neighborhood in search of drugs, and upon seeing Guerena with his rifle they opened fire, resulting in his death on his own kitchen floor.  No drugs were found in Guerena’s home and very little were found in the surrounding neighborhood.

The report claims the use of such impulsive tactics, such as these, results in not only a potential increase in distrust for officers everywhere, but also, “destroys property, and undermines individual liberty.”

- Advertisement -

Featrued Sponsors

Holland Center

Holland Center is a day treatment program and medical clinic for children with autism.

Life Info App

Support TiM by using the app to get cash back at major retailers.

Pure VPN

Military grade privacy on all devices.
- Advertisement -

Latest News

U.S. Government Sues Snowden Over Memoir Release

The U.S. government took swift legal action against famed NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden after the release of his memoir, "Permanent Record." The government's complaint, filed September 17th, alleges that Snowden, a former CIA employee and former contractor for the NSA, violated non-disclosure agreements with the NSA and CIA by publishing this book without first submitting it for prepublication review "in violation of his express obligations under the agreements he signed."

Holland Center

Holland Center is a day treatment program and medical clinic for children with autism.
video

Reality Check: Proof WTC Building 7 Did Not Fall Down The Way Gov. Agency Claims?

What really happened to World Trade Center Building 7 on September 11th, the Franklin Square and Munson Fire District Commissioners’ historic resolution calling for a new investigation, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks' bombshell multi-year, $300K study of WTC 7 and how it collapsed.
video

Proof Gov Wrong About Collapse of WTC Building 7?

In episode #2 of Truth in Media with Ben Swann, we discuss the new University of Alaska Fairbanks' bombshell multi-year, $300K study that explains...
video

Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks WTC Building 7 Study

"A Structural Reevaluation of the Collapse of World Trade Center 7" is a draft report based on a 4-year study conducted at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) by lead researcher Dr. J. Leroy Hulsey, the Professor of Civil Engineering at University of Alaska Fairbanks along with research assistants Dr. Feng Xiao, Associate Professor at Nanjing University of Science and Technology and Dr. Zhili Quan, Bridge Engineer at South Carolina Department of Transportation.
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This