Microsoft CEO apologizes again for saying women shouldn’t ask for raises

Must Read

U.S. Government Sues Snowden Over Memoir Release

The U.S. government took swift legal action against famed NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden after the release of his memoir, "Permanent Record." The government's complaint, filed September 17th, alleges that Snowden, a former CIA employee and former contractor for the NSA, violated non-disclosure agreements with the NSA and CIA by publishing this book without first submitting it for prepublication review "in violation of his express obligations under the agreements he signed."

Holland Center

Holland Center is a day treatment program and medical clinic for children with autism.

Reality Check: Proof WTC Building 7 Did Not Fall Down The Way Gov. Agency Claims?

What really happened to World Trade Center Building 7 on September 11th, the Franklin Square and Munson Fire District Commissioners’ historic resolution calling for a new investigation, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks' bombshell multi-year, $300K study of WTC 7 and how it collapsed.
Michael Lotfihttp://brandfireconsulting.com
Michael Lotfi is a Persian-American political analyst and adviser living in Nashville, Tennessee. Lotfi is the founder and CEO of BrandFire Consulting LLC. The firm specializes in public and private technology centered brand development, lead generation, data aggregation, online fundraising, social media, advertising, content generation, public relations, constituency management systems, print and more. Lotfi is the former executive state director for the Tennessee Tenth Amendment Center, a think-tank focused on restraining federal overreach. Lotfi graduated with top honors from Belmont University, a private Christian university located in Nashville, Tennessee.

BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON, October 17, 2014 – Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella issued another apology following his remarks at a conference for women where he suggested that women should not ask for raises. Nadella’s second apology was sent in the form of an internal company memo to all employees which Todd Bishop at GeekWire received.

In his apology, Nadella stated, “One of the answers I gave at the conference was generic advice that was just plain wrong. I apologize. For context, I had received this advice from my mentors and followed it in my own career.”

“I do believe that at Microsoft in general good work is rewarded, and I have seen it many times here. But my advice underestimated exclusion and bias — conscious and unconscious — that can hold people back. Any advice that advocates passivity in the face of bias is wrong. Leaders need to act and shape the culture to root out biases and create an environment where everyone can effectively advocate for themselves,” Nadella continued.

- Newsletter -

Nadella’s original comments at the Grace Hopper conference in Arizona last week were in response to a female conference attender’s question regarding how women should go about requesting a raise in the work firm. The conference was specifically geared to women in the tech field.

Nadella initially responded to the question posed at the conference by stating, “It’s not really about asking for the raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along.” He continued, “Not asking for a raise is good karma.”

You can read Nadella’s full apology in his company memo here.

In today’s monthly Q&A session, I want to give some perspective about the past few weeks — my trip to Asia, Gartner Symposium, the Adobe MAX conference, the Grace Hopper conference and Windows 10, as well as focus on Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) (and, of course, anything else on your minds). In November we’ll have a tightly focused conversation with Terry about Windows 10 more broadly.

Before our discussion, I want to provide additional thoughts from the Grace Hopper conference last week. Thank you to the many people who sent me comments and feedback over the past few days. It was a humbling and learning experience.

One of the answers I gave at the conference was generic advice that was just plain wrong. I apologize. For context, I had received this advice from my mentors and followed it in my own career. I do believe that at Microsoft in general good work is rewarded, and I have seen it many times here. But my advice underestimated exclusion and bias — conscious and unconscious — that can hold people back. Any advice that advocates passivity in the face of bias is wrong. Leaders need to act and shape the culture to root out biases and create an environment where everyone can effectively advocate for themselves.

Make no mistake: I am 100 percent committed to Diversity and Inclusion at the core of our culture and company. Microsoft has to be a great place to work for everybody. I deeply desire a vibrant culture of inclusion. I envision a company composed of more diverse talent. I envision more diverse executive staff and a more diverse Senior Leadership Team. Most of all, I envision a company that builds products that an expansive set of diverse and global customers love. As we make Diversity and Inclusion central to Microsoft’s business, we have the opportunity to spark change across the industry as well. This is the accountability the Senior Leadership Team and I own.

There are three areas in which we can and will make progress — starting immediately.

First, we need to continue to focus on equal pay for equal work and equal opportunity for equal work. Many employees have asked if they are paid on par with others at the company. Here’s what HR confirmed for me: Although it fluctuates by a bit each year, the overall differences in base pay among genders and races (when we consider level and job title) is consistently within 0.5% at Microsoft. For example, last year women in the US at the same title and level earned 99.7% of what men earned at the same title and level. In any given year, any particular group may be slightly above or slightly below 100 percent. But this obscures an important point: We must ensure not only that everyone receives equal pay for equal work, but that they have the opportunity to do equal work.

Second, we need to recruit more diverse talent to Microsoft at all levels of the company. As you saw in the numbers we recently released, we have work to do at Microsoft and across the industry. These numbers are not good enough, especially in a world in which our customers are diverse and global. To achieve this goal — and especially in engineering — we will have to expand the diversity of our workforce at the senior ranks and re-double our efforts in college and other hiring. Each member of the SLT will be goaled to increase Diversity and Inclusion.

Third, we need to expand training for all employees on how to foster an inclusive culture. Although we already offer training and development in these areas, we need to ensure the right level of accountability for modeling inclusive behaviors in all our work and actions. We all need to think about how Connects are written, performance feedback is delivered, new hires are selected, how promotion and pay decisions are made, etc. We need to focus on both the conscious and unconscious thinking that affects all these things, and mandatory training on D&I is a great place to start.

I am personally fully committed to these efforts and so is the rest of the Senior Leadership Team. We are going to work side by side with Gwen Houston, GM, Diversity and Inclusion, each month to drive progress on the three actions above, and Gwen and her team will continue to gather input, refine our existing plans and develop new approaches. I’ll report back to you in future all employee Q&A sessions starting in November.

When I took on my role as CEO I got advice to be bold and be right. Going to the Grace Hopper conference to further the discussion on women in technology was bold, yet my answer to a key question was not right. I learned, and we will together use this learning to galvanize the company for positive change. And I’ll certainly go back to Grace Hopper next year to continue the dialogue. We will make Microsoft an even better place to work and do great things.

Satya

Follow Michael Lotfi on Facebook & Twitter.

- Advertisement -

Featrued Sponsors

Holland Center

Holland Center is a day treatment program and medical clinic for children with autism.

Life Info App

Support TiM by using the app to get cash back at major retailers.

Pure VPN

Military grade privacy on all devices.
- Advertisement -

Latest News

U.S. Government Sues Snowden Over Memoir Release

The U.S. government took swift legal action against famed NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden after the release of his memoir, "Permanent Record." The government's complaint, filed September 17th, alleges that Snowden, a former CIA employee and former contractor for the NSA, violated non-disclosure agreements with the NSA and CIA by publishing this book without first submitting it for prepublication review "in violation of his express obligations under the agreements he signed."

Holland Center

Holland Center is a day treatment program and medical clinic for children with autism.
video

Reality Check: Proof WTC Building 7 Did Not Fall Down The Way Gov. Agency Claims?

What really happened to World Trade Center Building 7 on September 11th, the Franklin Square and Munson Fire District Commissioners’ historic resolution calling for a new investigation, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks' bombshell multi-year, $300K study of WTC 7 and how it collapsed.
video

Proof Gov Wrong About Collapse of WTC Building 7?

In episode #2 of Truth in Media with Ben Swann, we discuss the new University of Alaska Fairbanks' bombshell multi-year, $300K study that explains...
video

Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks WTC Building 7 Study

"A Structural Reevaluation of the Collapse of World Trade Center 7" is a draft report based on a 4-year study conducted at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) by lead researcher Dr. J. Leroy Hulsey, the Professor of Civil Engineering at University of Alaska Fairbanks along with research assistants Dr. Feng Xiao, Associate Professor at Nanjing University of Science and Technology and Dr. Zhili Quan, Bridge Engineer at South Carolina Department of Transportation.
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This