Tag Archives: Lawyer

New York Judge Lets Wife Serve Divorce Papers To Husband Via Facebook

A landmark ruling by a Manhattan Supreme Court Judge is allowing a woman to legally serve her husband with divorce papers via a private message on Facebook, due to the fact that he is “hard to find” and has no physical address.

The NY Daily News first reported that Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Matthew Cooper is allowing a 26-year-old nurse from Brooklyn, Ellanora Baidoo, to serve her elusive husband, Victor Sena Blood-Dzraku, with divorce papers, using a private Facebook message from her lawyer.

Cooper wrote that Baidoo is “granted permission serve defendant with the divorce summons using a private message through Facebook,” because of his lack of a registered physical address.

This transmittal shall be repeated by plaintiff’s attorney to defendant once a week for three consecutive weeks or until acknowledged,” wrote Cooper.

Andrew Spinnell, Baidoo’s lawyer, will be the one sending the messages to Blood-Dzraku. He told the NY Daily News that Baidoo and Blood-Dzraku, who are both from Ghana, were married in a civil ceremony in 2009.

Spinnell said that although Blood-Dzraku would not keep his promise to have a traditional Ghanian wedding ceremony, and the two never lived together, or consummated their marriage, Blood-Dzraku still does not want a divorce.

Cooper’s ruling states Blood-Dzraku mainly communicated with Baidoo by telephone and Facebook, and that she learned over a phone call that he “has no fixed address and no place of employment.”

Cooper went on to state that Blood-Dzraku has “refused to make himself available to be served with divorce papers,” and he has not been located, due to the fact that the “post office has no forwarding address for him, there is no billing address linked to his prepaid cell phone, and the Department of Motor Vehicles has no record of him.”

Spinnell told the NY Daily News that they have tried multiple ways to locate Blood-Dzraku, including hiring a private detective, and that the first Facebook message notifying him of his divorce was sent last week, but Blood-Dzraku has not responded.

JP Morgan Chase Whistleblower Reveals Bank and Fed Cover-Up of Fraud

Securities Lawyer, and former employee of JP Morgan Chase, Alayne Fleischmann, recently spoke out about her experience with the bank, in an interview with Rolling Stone, and revealed the government’s involvement with the “biggest cases of white-collar crime in American history.

Fleischmann began working for JP Morgan Chase as a deal manager in 2006. She first noticed problems when a new “manager for diligence” was hired to review loans, and he insisted that the employees stop sending him emails. Fleischmann noted that he was “wary of putting anything in writing when it came to its mortgage deals.

The whole point of having a compliance and diligence group is to have policies that are set out clearly in writing,” said Fleischmann. “So to have exactly the opposite of that – that was very worrisome.”

The errors continued, and Fleischmann told Rolling Stone that when she raised concerns about “toxic loans,” she found the number crunchers who had also been complaining about the loans “suddenly began changing their reports.

Fleischmann explained the changes by saying that the head diligence manager started “yelling at his team, berating them, making them do reports over and over, keeping them late at night,” in the same way an interrogator “verbally abuses the target until he starts producing the desired answers.”

Everything that I thought was bad at the time turned out to be a million times worse,” Fleischmann said.

In 2007, Fleischmann sent a letter to William Buell, a managing director at JP Morgan Chase. According to Rolling Stone, Fleischmann’s letter “warned Buell of the consequences of reselling bad loans as securities and gave detailed descriptions of breakdowns in Chase’s diligence process.

It used to be if you wrote a memo, they had to stop, because now there’s proof that they knew what they were doing,” said Fleischmann. “But when the Justice Department doesn’t do anything, that stops being a deterrent. I just didn’t know that at the time.

Fleischmann was terminated from the company in the midst of a round of lay-offs in 2008. An investigator from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission contacted her in 2012, regarding her knowledge of the events that occurred during her time at JP Morgan Chase. While the investigators were interested in certain parts of her story, it was not until 2013 that she was able to relay her full knowledge. This included “the edict against e-mails, the sabotaging of the diligence process, the bullying, the written warnings that were ignored, all of it.”

However, rather than taking JP Morgan Chase to court, Rolling Stone noted that the government “decided to help Chase bury the evidence,” which began when a press conference to announce the civil-fraud charges against the bank, scheduled by Attorney General Eric Holder for September 24, 2013, was “suddenly canceled, and no complaint was filed.”

Every time I had a chance to talk, something always got in the way,” said Fleischmann. She explained that while it originally seemed like the U.S. government was interested in her testimony, and in brining justice to the crimes committed by JP Morgan Chase, she learned that it was the opposite.

The Justice Department’s political wing, led by Eric Holder, “appeared to be using her, and her evidence, as a bargaining chip to extract more hush money” from JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon. The Department succeeded in doing this, and they were paid $9 billion by Dimon in a settlement that released JP Morgan Chase from civil liability.

Fleischman admitted that telling her story, and taking both JP Morgan Chase and the Justice Department to task could have serious ramifications.

I could be sued into bankruptcy. I could lose my license to practice law. I could lose everything,” said Fleischmann. “But if we don’t start speaking up, then this really is all we’re going to get: the biggest financial cover-up in history.

Vice President’s Son Discharged from Navy for Cocaine Use, Keeps License to Practice Law

On Thursday, it was revealed that Vice President Joe Biden’s youngest son, 44-year-old Hunter Biden, was released from the Navy in February, after he tested positive for cocaine use.

In a statement from Hunter Biden’s lawyer, he said:

It was the honor of my life to serve in the U.S. Navy and I deeply regret and am embarrassed that my actions led to my administrative discharge. I respect the navy’s decision. With the love and support of my family I’m moving forward.

Hunter Biden graduated from Yale with a law degree, and he currently works in Washington as the private equity executive and board director of an international energy firm, in addition to practicing law in Connecticut.

Yahoo News reported that Biden, “faces no automatic review of his law license in Connecticut following his discharge from the U.S. Navy Reserve after testing positive for cocaine use.

According to Connecticut’s Statewide Bar Counselor, Michael P. Bowler, lawyers in Connecticut face automatic review of their bar admission only when they have been convicted of a crime.

At this point, I’m not aware that Mr. Biden has been arrested for anything, and certainly not convicted,” Bowler said.

According to Business Insider, Biden was “commissioned as a Navy ensign May 7, 2013 and assigned as a public affairs officer at a reserve unit” in Norfolk, Virginia. However, one month after he checked into his new unit, he failed a regular drug test, and was discharged in February.

USA Today reported that, according to the commander of the Navy Public Affairs Support Element based in Norfolk, Capt. Jack Hanzlik, “There should have been no question in Hunter Biden’s mind about the possibility of a random drug test.”

All sailors would be advised of the zero-tolerance policies when reporting aboard,” said Hanzlik. “And they would be advised of the testing practices of the organization, as well.”

Regarding the fact that Biden tested positive for cocaine in June 2013, but was not discharged until February 2014, Hanzlik said, “Until an issue like that is adjudicated, the member continues to serve.”

Drug tests are given to both active and reserve members, at least once a year, scanning for everything from marijuana to heroin to cocaine.

Although Hanzlik said it was a random process, he explained that for members of the military, “The expectation, always, is that you need to be ready. Because you could have to give a sample today, you might have to give a sample again tomorrow. And two weeks from now, you might have to give a sample.

We have this kind of conversation with our sailors all the time — about expectations for performance,” said Hanzlik. “Expectations for standards. Reliability on one another.