Tag Archives: Samuel DuBose

University of Cincinnati to Pay $4.85 Million to Family of Samuel DuBose After Police Shooting

The family of a man shot and killed by police during a traffic stop in July has reached a settlement of $4.85 million with the University of Cincinnati.

In addition to the money, the family of Samuel DuBose will receive approximately $500,000 in educational scholarships or free undergraduate education for DuBose’s 12 children, a memorial to DuBose will be created on campus, and the family will be included in future discussions with the Community Advisory Committee about police reform.

[RELATED: Cincinnati Officer Indicted for Murder After Body Camera Reveals False Report]

Ray Tensing, 25, was indicted for murder in the shooting death of DuBose, 43, on July 29, 2015. The shooting occurred during a traffic stop on July 19, 2015, in which Tensing pulled DuBose over for driving without a front license plate on his car.

Tensing told his fellow officers that he fired his gun because he feared for his life after his hand got caught on DuBose’s car, and he thought DuBose would run him over.

However, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters confirmed that the footage from Tensing’s body cam appeared to directly contradict his story by showing that the car did not did not start rolling until after Tensing pulled out his gun, shot DuBose in the head, and then fell backwards.

Deters called the shooting “totally unwarranted” and said it was the “most asinine act” he had ever seen from a police officer.

[RELATED: Officers Involved In Samuel DuBose Coverup Will Not Face Charges]

The same grand jury that indicted Tensing for DuBose’s murder announced on Aug. 1 that the other two University of Cincinnati officers who arrived on the scene would not face charges.

Officers Phillip Kidd and David Lindenschmidt, who were initially placed on paid administrative leave while the university investigated, claimed they witnessed Tensing being dragged by DuBose’s car and corroborated his false account of the shooting.

In a statement from UC President Santa Ono, he said the agreement was made as part of the healing process for the family, as well as the community of Cincinnati.

“I want to again express on behalf of the University of Cincinnati community our deepest sadness and regrets at the heartbreaking loss of the life of Samuel DuBose,” Ono said. “This agreement is also part of the healing process not only for the family but also for our university and Cincinnati communities.”

Cincinnati Activists Unite For ‘March for Justice’ With Families Of Those Killed By Police

On Saturday, Sept. 19th, activists from around the Cincinnati area will gather for a march for justice with family members of individuals who have been killed at the hands of the police.

The United March for Justice is being organized by the group Awakened Cincinnatians and will have support from the families of Samuel DuBose, Samantha Ramsey, Tamir Rice, and John Crawford III. The peaceful march will take place at 6 p.m. Saturday night in front of the University of Cincinnati Police Department.

“Stand for justice by marching arm in arm with the families of Samuel DuBose, Samantha Ramsey, Tamir Rice and John Crawford III,” Awakened Cincinnatians stated. “Families and friends of the fallen will be traveling from all over the country to participate in this historic event.”

Family members of the deceased are expected to speak before the march begins. The facebook page for the event calls for “indictments not just charges.” The event will begin at the corner of Rice and Valencia streets, the spot where Samuel DuBose was killed two months ago.

In July Truth In Media reported that DuBose, 43, was shot and killed by former officer Ray Tensing, 25, after Tensing pulled DuBose over for driving without a front license plate on July 19. While Tensing claimed that he opened fire because he feared for his life after his hand was caught on DuBose’s vehicle, and DuBose started accelerating, footage from the body camera Tensing was wearing revealed that his hand was placed on the car door and that DuBose’s vehicle only started moving after Tensing shot DuBose in the head.

Two University of Cincinnati police officers, who arrived on the scene when former officer Ray Tensing shot Samuel DuBose during a routine traffic stop, face no charges for supporting Tensing’s false claims of being dragged by DuBose’s vehicle.

Samantha Ramsey was a 19-year-old preschool teacher from Kentucky who was killed on April 26 by sheriff’s deputy Tyler Brockman after he jumped on the hood of her car and fired four times into the vehicle. The deputy avoided charges but is facing a lawsuit by Ramsey’s family who say that the officer is lying about how the events unfolded.

In November 2014, Officer Timothy Loehman shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice while he was playing in a park. According to the autopsy report, Rice died from a gunshot wound to the torso with “injuries of major vessel, intestines and pelvis.”

According to reports and video surveillance, Rice was playing in the park with a toy airsoft gun that shoots plastic pellets. Rice was shot less than two seconds after the police car pulled up beside him in the park.

Twenty-two year old John Crawford III was shot by a Beavercreek police officer after being seen holding a BB gun inside the Wal-Mart near Dayton, Ohio. A grand jury would later find the officer innocent of murder.

The United March for Justice is not the first time that Cincinnati activists have rallied diverse groups together to focus on common ground. On August 5th, activists in Ohio with Greene County Black Lives Matter, Anonymous #OpJohnCrawford, Beavercreek CopBlock and Ohio Open Carry marked the one year anniversary of John Crawford III’s death.

Perhaps more activists can learn a lesson from Cincinnati’s efforts to build alliances rather than focus on division. Only by being willing to set aside our dogmas and work together in the interest of Liberty can we begin to repeal the tyranny of government and create a more free world.

Officers Involved In Samuel DuBose Coverup Will Not Face Charges

Two University of Cincinnati police officers who arrived on the scene when former officer Ray Tensing shot Samuel DuBose during a routine traffic stop, will not face charges for corroborating Tensing’s false claims of being dragged by DuBose’s vehicle.

After officers Phillip Kidd and David Lindenschmidt were placed on paid administrative leave while the university investigated, the Hamilton County grand jury announced on Friday that it will not indict the officers for charges related to DuBose’s death.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcGXz90oAxE

DuBose, 43, was shot and killed by Tensing, 25, after Tensing pulled DuBose over for driving without a front license plate on July 19. While Tensing claimed that he opened fire because he feared for his life after his hand was caught on DuBose’s vehicle, and DuBose started accelerating, footage from the body camera Tensing was wearing revealed that his hand was placed on the car door and that DuBose’s vehicle only started moving after Tensing shot DuBose in the head.

In addition to showing that Tensing’s story was false, the body cam also revealed that after arriving on the scene, Kidd and Lindenschmidt were quick to accept Tensing’s narrative, with Kidd going as far as to say that he had witnessed DuBose’s vehicle dragging Tensing down the street.

[RELATED: Cincinnati Officer Indicted For Murder After Body Camera Reveals False Report]

The same grand jury that chose not to indict Kidd and Lindenschmidt, indicted Tensing for murder in the death of DuBose on Wednesday. Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters called the shooting “totally unwarranted” and said it was the “most asinine act” he had ever seen a police officer make.

However, in the case of Kidd and Lindenschmidt, Deters said that although they initially repeated Tensing’s false account without witnessing it, since then they “have been truthful and honest about what happened and no charges are warranted.”

“These officers were totally cooperative in the investigation and consistent in their statements,” Deters said. “There was some confusion over the way the initial incident report was drafted, but that was not a sworn statement by the officers and merely a short summary of information.”

[RELATED: Officers Caught In Samuel DuBose Coverup Were Involved In Death Of Another Unarmed Man]

In addition to initially covering up the DuBose shooting, Kidd was also one of seven officers named in a lawsuit in the death of Kelly Brinson, 45, a mentally ill man who died at Cincinnati’s University hospital in 2010. Brinson was taken to a seclusion room after suffering a psychotic episode, and was shocked with a taser three times and restrained by shackles. As a result, Brinson went into cardiac arrest and died three days later.

Tensing, who has pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and involuntary manslaughter, was involved in another heated traffic stop in May 2014 after he pulled two men over claiming that their bumper was dragging.

Officers Caught In Samuel DuBose Coverup Were Involved In Death Of Another Unarmed Man

University of Cincinnati police officers Eric Weibel and Phillip Kidd, who repeated the false narrative of former officer Ray Tensing after he shot and killed Samuel DuBose during a routine traffic stop, were involved in the death of another unarmed black man in 2010.

Weibel and Kidd were two of the seven officers named in a lawsuit, according to court documents obtained by The Guardian, in the death of Kelly Brinson, 45, a mentally ill man who was a patient at Cincinnati’s University hospital.

The Guardian reported that after suffering a psychotic episode in Jan. 2010, Brinson was taken to a seclusion room at the hospital by UC officers and was then shocked with a taser three times and restrained by shackles. As a result, Brinson went into cardiac arrest and died three days later.

Brinson’s family filed a civil lawsuit against both UC police and the hospital, alleging that the seven officers involved used excessive force and acted with “deliberate indifference to the serious medical and security needs of Mr. Brinson.”

Accusing the officers and hospital staff involved of civil right violations, malpractice, discrimination and negligence, the lawsuit notes that Brinson was a civilian hospital patient, not a criminal, and that the only drugs in his system at the time were psychiatric medications prescribed by the hospital staff.

Derek Brinson, Kelly Brinson’s brother, told The Guardian that while all of the officers involved in the case were supposed to be terminated, they ended up keeping their jobs after Brinson’s family received a settlement of $638,000.

Five years after Brinson’s death, Weibel and Kidd have been involved in the case surrounding the death of another unarmed black man: Samuel DuBose.

[RELATED: Cincinnati Officer Indicted For Murder After Body Camera Reveals False Report]

As Truth In Media previously reported, former UC officer Ray Tensing was indicted for murder on Wednesday in the shooting death of DuBose, 43, after body camera footage contradicted Tensing’s account. In addition to showing that Tensing’s story was false, the body cam he was wearing also showed that the officers arriving on the scene were quick to repeat Tensing’s false account, even going as far as to say that they witnessed it occurring.

While Tensing initially claimed that he shot DuBose during a routine traffic stop because he feared for his life after his hand was caught in DuBose’s car, which began to accelerate, dragging Tensing down the street, the footage from Tensing’s body cam directly contradicted his account.

After reviewing the footage, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters noted that while DuBose did put his keys in the ignition of the car, it did not start rolling until after Tensing pulled out his gun, shot DuBose in the head, and then fell backwards.

The Guardian reported that in the UC police division report, authored by Weibel, he does not say anything about witnessing the shooting, but he did write that the uniform Tensing was wearing “looked as if it had been dragged over a rough surface,” and the report overall supports Tensing’s account.

Weibel also wrote that Kidd told him he witnessed the Honda Accord DuBose was driving “drag Officer Tensing,” and that he witnessed Tensing “fire a single shot.”

Kidd and another officer on the scene, David Lindenschmidt, who both claimed to have witnessed Tensing being dragged down the street by DuBose’s car, have been placed on paid administrative leave and an internal investigation is being conducted.

Cincinnati Officer Indicted For Murder After Body Camera Reveals False Report

University of Cincinnati Police Officer Ray Tensing was indicted for murder on Wednesday in the shooting death of Samuel DuBose, after body camera footage contradicted Tensing’s account.

Tensing, 25, pulled over DuBose, 43, for a missing license plate on the front of his car on July 19. Following the shooting, Tensing told his fellow officers that he fired his gun because he feared for his life after his hand got caught on DuBose’s car, and he thought DuBose would run him over.

“I think I’m OK,” Tensing said after the incident, according to his body cam recording. “He was just dragging me. I thought I was going to get run over. I was trying to stop him.”

However, the footage from Tensing’s body cam appears to directly contradict his story. At a news conference on Wednesday, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters noted that while DuBose did put his keys in the ignition of the car, it did not start rolling until after Tensing pulled out his gun, shot DuBose in the head, and then fell backwards.

“It is our belief that he was not dragged,” Deters said. “If you slow down this tape you see what happens, it is a very short period of time from when the car starts rolling to when a gun is out and he’s shot in the head.”

CNN noted that while Tensing left the scene with another officer to go to the hospital to get checked out, the footage from the body cam “shows no one rendering aid to DuBose.”

Deters called the incident “totally unwarranted,” and said he believes Tensing’s false report was his way of “making an excuse for a purposeful killing.”

[quote_center]“I’ve been doing this for over 30 years. This is the most asinine act I’ve ever seen a police officer make – totally unwarranted,” Deters said. “It’s an absolute tragedy in the year 2015 that anyone would behave in this manner. It was senseless.”[/quote_center]

Deters also noted that while “people want to believe” that DuBose, who was unarmed, “had done something violent towards the officer,” video footage from the scene shows that he did not. “I feel so sorry for his family and what they lost, and I feel sorry for the community, too,” Deters said.

Following the shooting, The Guardian noted that in addition to Tensing giving his account of events to other officers arriving at the scene, two of those officers repeated Tensing’s version, claiming he was dragged by DuBose, and one of the officers “claims to have witnessed it occurring.”

The Associated Press reported that during Tensing’s arraignment on Thursday morning, where he pleaded “not guilty” to charges of murder and involuntary manslaughter, “people in the courtroom audience erupted into cheers and clapping” when Tensing’s bond was set at $1 million.